Posts Tagged ‘Silver jewelry sourcing’

A Quick 2012 Update….

Monday, February 14th, 2011

Hi Everyone,

This is Jan Brassem, (Brassem Global Consulting and MainBrace Partners), …just got back from vacation in Florida and was out of touch for a while. I’m ready to start writing again.

 I was thrilled to learn that over 700,000 of you have been reading this blog and have left more than 230,000 comments – most were useful and constructive.

Many of you like my writing style — and some don’t — but that’s totally okay. Please keep the comments on silver jewelry coming. Your comments — good or bad — help me design a better blog which — I hope — is easier reading for you.  But please don’t use spam — it’s really a waste of time.

Spam can be a problem. As you know, I read each comment. “If you take the time to write a comment,” as the saying goes, “I’ll take the time to read it.”

Since this site is now so popular, we really have to be more critical of spam. So, unless you follow these simple rules, our spam ‘filter’ will automatically delete you comment.

  • Be sure to put you full name, (not company or product name),  on your comments. Unless we get a name we cannot accept the comment.
  • Please be sure you don’t use profane or bad language, (you know what I mean).
  • Please do not refer or endorse a porno site, escort service or any sexual content of any kind, here or overseas.
  • Please do use this blog site to promote products or services, (i.e. mattresses, automobiles, athletic jerseys, viagra, dating services, apartments, you get the idea). Some of these products or services are referred to 10 or even 20 times before we delete them. Please save yourself — and us — time.

Many, (maybe 50%), of the comments belong in the spam folder and have been deleted. It does no good to anyone, (other than maybe you), not the reader, not the blogging industry and certainly not the writer to express views on unrelated products, disconnected thoughts and even political views. Some of you do this repeatedly, (sometimes as often as 20 times a day). It really wastes time for everyone since they are quickly deleted.

On the other hand, some of the comments are wonderful. Evelyn suggested we go into more detail, (we’re worried about boring you). Juan suggested that we install a translation program so people from other countries can read the posts. Paul even suggested that we check spelling, (hurrumph).

Several readers asked for permission to use part of our blog on their web site. Permission granted as long as full ‘attribution’ is made. A few readers asked me to be a guest blogger on their site. For these bloggers I suggest that they email me, (Jan@BrassemGlobalConsulting.com), and I’ll gladly comply.

Please keep your (non-spam), comments coming. We read each one and they are great.

See you soon. We’re on our way to Hong Kong Island on the way to the fair. You’re in for a few surprises…

Jan Brassem

‘The Colonel’ on the Corner: Sourcing Silver Jewelry in Hong Kong: (Part 6)

Wednesday, January 26th, 2011
 
 
Ricardo, (the Brad Pitt look-alike) and I, Jan Brassem, his boss, walked out through Peninsula Hotel’s glamorous front door. Two young, white-gloved, smiling, bellmen wearing smart-looking outfits and the famous ‘cake caps’, (remember the Philip Morris pitchman), wished us a good day. 
 
We were on our way to the famous Hong Kong Jewelry Fair at the breathtaking Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre.
 
When you walk outside, the hot, smelly, polluted Asian air can surprise you – as it always does me. From my experience, however, your nose quickly adjusts to the, ahh, unpleasant stink  aroma. 
 
“Not like New York, eh?” I said to Ricardo, err, Brad. He shook his head. He was, after all, a die-in-the-wool ‘Noo Yawker’. When we left the city, only three days ago, it was cold and snowing.
 
I was wearing a light-colored summer shirt, a light weight sports jacket and comfortable slacks. Brad didn’t plan as well. The dark suite he was wearing – with a tie, no less — was the wrong thing to wear in Hong Kong, no matter what time of year. Those were only worn by ranking HK government officials or important businessmen.
 
He probably didn’t know any better. He didn’t bother to Google the Hong Kong climate, or, especially, its culture. Suits are not worn in Hong Kong, by foreign buyers, unless it’s white and extremely light weight. He would learn that soon enough. It may be true what they say about New Yorkers: They can be the provincial.
 
The Peninsula’s versions of taxis — chocolate-colored Rolls Royce — were neatly lined up to the left of the door. Never mind, we were on our way to the famous Hong Kong Jewelry Fair by foot and by the legendary Star Ferry.
 
It was a short walk to the Star Ferry dock. The traffic’s hustle and bustle was like New York, except for a few woman who carried  parasols to screen the sun.
 
We passed the city’s famous Tech Center, a few stores, tea shops and a bunch of impressive buildings. (At right, is a typical Hong Kong street at night, just like the one we walked to the ferry.)
 
Further down, on the right, in stark contrast, was a handful of “wanted posters” glued to a stonewall. We stopped to look. “Wanted for Murder” read one. “Wanted for Sedition,” read another.
 
“What’s sedition?” Brad asked. I didn’t answer.
 
We arrived at the pier – kind of a transportation hub. Busses, taxis, bicycles, pedestrians squirmed about. 
 
There it was, on a far corner.
 
 Oh, no, The Colonel!
 
Brad saw The Colonel too. “Can we get some fried chicken and a Coke?” He asked.
 
“We’re in Hong Kong. You can get that in New York.” I told him. ”You can’t be that hungry, it’s just eight in the morning.”
 
This could end up being a long trip.

We bought our ferry tickets, (about $3.50 each), and proceeded down a covered pier. An incoming ferry was not far away – visible through some open windows. In a few minutes it was docked. By now the pier was full of milling people, reminding me of NYC subways.
 
“You must feel right at home here.” I yelled at Brad. “Just like the Q Train at Grand Central.”
 
There was a difference. There seems to be cultural respect for individual space. While on NYC subways, there is pushing and shoving, there was none of that here. I am always impressed.
 
We found an empty bench, rotated the back rest, (so we could sit facing front), and sat close to the railing, near the water. By this time, Brad was sweating. I kinda felt sorry for him…..or maybe not.
 
“Every time I take the ferry I become melancholy.” I was talking to Brad and myself. “…Brings back tough memories.”
 
“Huh?” He was evidentally a man of few words.
“Years ago,” I nodded to Victoria Harbour, “I was a severely wounded Vietnam GI sent to Hong Kong on R&R to recover. My body and spirit were hurting. Thanks, in part, to Victoria’s help , I recovered.”

I wasn’t sure why I was even talking to Brad –  like talking to an open window. “In those days, I must have spent 18 hours on the ferry and the Harbour – back and forth – to get my spirit back.” I was  rambling.

 Enough of that. “Let’s talk business.” I looked at Brad.
 
I told him that we will be dealing with some of the smartest and shrewdest jewelers in the world. We have to be a team. We gotta’ focus on the merchandise that our customers will buy. We have to get it at the right price, at the right terms, at the right quality and at the right delivery schedule.
 
 Not that easy to do.
 We will be dealing with some of the smartest and shrewdest jewelers in the world.
 So, Brad and I developed a clever and innovative  buying strategy.
 
I told Brad to do the initial selection using all the marketing data that we brought along. (He was, after all, the Assistant Merchandise Manager.)  He would purchase no more than US$10,000 per vendor.
 
I would follow Brad to each vendor and negotiate price, quality, payment and delivery terms. If we liked the vendor’s conditions, I would signal Brad, who would then come back and select more from him or her.  If I didn’t like their conditions, I would cancel the order.
 
“Wouldn’t that make the vendor mad at us?”
 
“Better have them mad at us, than to be mad at ourselves.” I said. “Not a great feeling to have over-priced, poor quality merchandise delivered late and already paid for.”  Brad understood, I think……
 
After awhile, thankfully, the ferry landed at the famous Hong Kong Convention & Exhibition Centre. We made it and not a minute to soon.

To be continued next week so stay tuned…. 

 

Brad Pitt & Frankenstein. Sourcing Silver Jewelry In Hong Kong: Part 4

Thursday, January 6th, 2011

(more…)

Sourcing Silver in Hong Kong with Brad Pitt: Part 3

Friday, December 24th, 2010

But wait, we’re getting ahead of ourselves. Keep in mind, the bullet-train’s windows only give a few snap-shots of Hong Kong. The history or the city goes deeper. (Duh!)

Don’t forget, I’m on a buying (a.k.a. sourcing) trip for my New York-based silver jewelry company. (That’s right, I’m a Noo Yawka). I’ve asked the company’s Product Development Officer, Susan, to join me. She declined — some lame excuse about being eight and a half months pregnant. She suggested I ask her second in command, Ricardo Mummitti. I asked. He accepted.

Ricardo a young 32 year-old, single guy, looks a little like Brad Pitt but with an Ed Norton brain, (remember Jackie Gleason’s Honeymooners? If you don’t, your Dad will.) There’s another problem with Ed; he’s a New Yorker too, having never been outside the Bronx or Manhattan. When it comes to sourcing, he’s a ‘rookie’ – with a reputation of asking irritating questions.

Back to Hong Kong. Without going into too much detail, Hong Kong was, until recently, a British possession. So, English is the ‘second’ language, after Chinese Cantonese. Mandarin is the other Chinese language, but only spoken on mainland China.

Nevertheless, the city has a wonderful mix of Chinese and British culture. Many British investment banks, and their English executives, keep the ‘old-school’ British traditions alive – lunch clubs, three-piece suits, lawn tennis and all that.

All told, Hong Kong is clean, orderly and modern.

But, the Chinese culture still has the upper hand. The appearance of the streets is clearly Chinese, (see the picture on the right). As a matter of fact, tea, the Chinese version of American soft-drinks, is sold in tea parlors on almost every corner. They remind me of New York’s pizza shops.

There are even some subtle signs of American culture. McDonald’s – believe it or not — has a large restaurant near the Star Ferry Pier, a landmark in Kowloon.

All told, Hong Kong is clean, orderly and modern.

 On the train, we were sitting next to jewelers from Mumbai, Istanbul and Vietnam, all headed to the fair.  

No matter how hard he tried, Ricardo’s head was spinning; his eyes couldn’t keep up with the sights — the train was moving too fast. After a while, he lost interest or he got a headache – or both. He started with the questions.

“What’s on the other side of the harbor?” He asked.

I answered as simply as possible. Hong Kong is really divided into three parts: Hong Kong Island, (called Hong Kong), Kowloon and New Territories. People mainly live in Kowloon, along with some stores, small factories and hotels. My favorite institution, The Hong Kong Museum, is in Kowloon too.

New Territories is full of tall apartment buildings to accommodate the flood of people arriving from mainland China.

Hong Kong is an Asian center for banks, brokerage houses, foreign embassies and such. Government offices and the Hong Kong Convention & Exhibition Centreare there too. There’s a lot to do and see in Hong Kong Island but, I told Ricardo, explore the sights on your own time.

Ricardo chimed in. “I’d like to email my babe”, (New York translation: girlfriend). “ What hotel we staying at?”

Although there are hundreds of marvelous hotels in the city, I told him I had made reservations at the world-famous Peninsula Hotel. The place is very expensive, but arguably the best hotel service in the world. Among other things, each floor has a butler so chances are your bags will be unpacked before you reach your room.

“If the hotel is so expensive why not go somewhere cheaper?” he asked

Well, during WWII, Hong Kong was occupied by the Japanese. My uncle was a Dutch soldier, captured and interred, (and died), in The Peninsula — then a Japanese POW prison.

Staying there makes me – err, emotional. Maybe the room I’m staying in will be the cell he died in.

“Okay Ricardo”, I said in my deep executive voice, “No more questions. Let’s start thinking about the fair and what you’ll be doing there. Let’s make the company some money.”

“Now starts the business of sourcing globally,” I told him. “You might even learn something.”

To be continued…

Everybody Loves silver jewelry — and Sales Prove it!

Sunday, May 2nd, 2010

Cue the Trumpets. Sterling silver jewelry is hereby recognized as a viable and dynamic jewelry category by the “Main-Street” jewelry storeowner.

Wait a minute, there’s an illogic here. Numerous jewelry retail channels have already recognized silver jewelry for what it is; beautiful, creative and especially profitable.

mystery-ladyTake Tiffany & Co., for example. Over the years, Tiffany has become a retail channel by itself. Their skilled management team pioneered silver styling, (i.e. remember the 3-pronged Tiffany setting), merchandising, branding, (i.e. Elsa Peretti, Paloma Picasso) and pricing.

Silver jewelry has become a strong – if not major — part of their product mix. How big a part is, of course, a carefully guarded trade secret? They’ve been doing their silver jewelry homework for decades.

“Cue the Trumpets. Silver jewelry is hereby recognized as a viable and dynamic jewelry category.”

Take major department stores, for example. Silver jewelry has become a department store staple. Just check Macy’s, (Judith Jack’s Victorian silver jewelry ‘look’), or check other department stores for popular designer brands. Silver jewelry has become an important showcase profit center.

Take the big TV shopping networks, OVC and HSN, for example. They both have a wonderful eye for combining semi-precious stones, (Malaysian Jade, Lapis Lazuli, Charoite, Blue Lace Agate, the list is endless), with silver. Some stones are even hand carved.

Where did I, Jan Brassem, find all this information, you ask. For almost seven years, I owned a very successful silver jewelry brand. (I sold it a couple of years ago.) I designed and then imported the brand from Hong Kong, India, China, Thailand, Italy, Indonesia, Mexico, Africa and Canada.

After all this time, I’ve acquired an understanding of silver jewelry marketing, sourcing, merchandising and pricing.
Dare I say it? I’ve developed a strong bias to silver jewelry.

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Did I mention that we love to write. Just email us (Jan@BrassemGlobalConsulting.com) and maybe we can write for you too.

Also, if you looking to place an ad here, we’ll do that too….we’re cheap. Just email us.

Finally, if you have specific questions about the technology we use, just email us and we’ll fill you in.

Let’s be honest, any advice you can give us, is great. We have received 3,500 comments and an estimated 10,000 reads. (3,500 are better than one).

We have also installed an anti-spam program. In addition to the 3,500 comments we have also deleted – manually – an additional 1,200 spams.